Corraline algea

Discussion in 'General Reef Discussion' started by Guido5526, Oct 30, 2017.

  1. Guido5526

    Guido5526 Junior Member
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    B6444CBB-4E6A-44B4-911B-A9FF5D1E585E.jpeg maybe a dumb question or has been answered before and I didn’t do my searching but is it possible for coralline algea to hinder the bacteria nitrification proccess in the rocks if it’s completley covered? Granted this rock will go bye bye when the new tank is set up as it was purchased as live rock and had filled the tank with tons of hitchhikers but was just curious for when the other tank I have gets older.
     
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  2. RSnodgrass

    RSnodgrass TCMAS President
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    Hmmm, I wonder if anyone with a microscope could speak to the porosity of a coraline surface.

    Alternatively it may work better because of more anaerobic surface area internally...?
     
  3. OP
    Guido5526

    Guido5526 Junior Member
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    I have plenty of flakes to donate for this cause. Haha
     
  4. capman

    capman I contributed!
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    Just guessing here...

    But I'd think that active, extensive coralline algae growth would be taking up nitrate, so even if it did reduce porosity and thus reduced denitrification (possibly), then that might be inconsequential. I would not be surprised if uptake by actively growing algae might exceed denitrification (but again, just guessing here).

    And as noted above, it might actually create more anaerobic interior (though with less access perhaps). The lower sides of the rocks are probably still quite porous.
     
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  5. capman

    capman I contributed!
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    And furthermore:

    I'd guess that really great coralline algae growth might be an indication of things going really well in your tank, in which case maybe you don't really need to worry too much about your denitrification rates.
     
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  6. capman

    capman I contributed!
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    I'm curious what sorts of hitchhikers the rock brought in? Aiptasia would be a problem, of course, as would a few other things, but really, the hitchhikers otherwise are a large part of what makes reef tanks so magical.

    I kind of get the sense that you are seeing the coralline algae as a bad thing. But to me extensive coralline algae growth like this not only makes a reef system look more like the real thing (more like natural marine habitats in the wild) but also is an indication that you probably have a really thriving reef system where you are really getting things right.
     
  7. OP
    Guido5526

    Guido5526 Junior Member
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    I had some Zoas that came on a rock and I think it brought in flatworms and the red bristle/fire worms. I’ve dipped every coral that’s in there and thinking they came with the rock. I don’t find the Coraline necessarily bad. I was just curious. I’ve heard of old tank syndrome or what ever it was referred to, granted this ones only a year or two old I wasn’t sure if the coraline was what played in to the “old tank”. It’s runing great I don’t have to do much to it anymore besides the weekly maintenance of water change and filter floss now. This was just one of those random thoughts that runs through my mind on a regular basis. Usually when I can’t sleep and lay there for hours thinking about stuff like this.
     
  8. David Grigor

    David Grigor TCMAS Old Timer
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    I wouldn't be concerned at all over it. It's likely very negligable if anything. Coraline would only grow on the tops, you still have a large portion of the rock area that would not be covered.

    I will say though that not just coraline but detritus buildup probably just as much or a bigger factor. When your doing tank maintenance and you have your hands in the tank, I highly recommend turkey basting the pores to keep the detritus from collecting. I think this is pretty important IMO. When you rock is 10+ years in the tank some will call it old tank syndrome, but like that Macna is just Lazy reefer syndrome. Turkey Baste regularly and all will be good.
     
    #8 David Grigor, Nov 1, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2017

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