Mollies from fresh to salt questions

Discussion in 'Brackish water' started by Vashjir, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. Vashjir

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    So I got a sack-o-mollies from a good buddy last night and I'm planning on transitioning them to full salt. I know this can be done in a few hours, but that the long term survival of the quick acclimated fish isn't very good, so I'm planning on taking a week or two. I'll be doing small increasingly saline water changes each day. The tank is a standard 25g kept at 80 degrees.
    The tank is currently running with a fully cycled (freshwater) sponge filter, but obviously that isn't going to do much for sw biofiltration. So my 1st question is when I should start adding liverock (at what salinity level)? Or is there a better way to provide biofiltration in a 'temporary' setup like this? I have plenty of other sponge filters sitting around and a few small bioloaded sponges in other sw tanks that I could toss into a hob filter.

    Assuming everything goes smoothly I should have a few extras at the swap too which I'll post closer to the actual date.



    Edit: not 100% sure this is the right section, mods feel free to move.
     
    #1 Vashjir, Nov 1, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  2. ArstenA

    ArstenA I contributed!
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    I was always told to just throw them in...
     
  3. patrick siverson

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    when I did it with guppy I just did it In a couple hours but make sure u don't have that strong of flow otherwise they get blown around to much.
     
  4. guy9smiley2

    guy9smiley2 Senior Member
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    I've done it long drip. And few hours. Others a few days. Just never seemed to live more than 2-6 months.
     
  5. Chad Vossen

    Chad Vossen Vossen kinda rhymes with awesome
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    Make sure to slowly acclimate a female that's got babies. When the babies are born, they will do MUCH better in the saltwater than the adults. Grow them up, and you'll have healthier mollies. For some reason, adults that make the switch never look the greatest.
     
  6. HamLakeReefer

    HamLakeReefer Senior Member

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    This is how I did it over a week. The fish are healthy and breeding now in full marine environment.

    Set up the FW with your filter of choice, I make sure to have carbon going to reduce build up of organics.

    I then after a few days of the mollies/guppies, do a partial water change of 10% or so. Drain off FW and replace it with SW from you main system.
    Repeat each day or every other day until you reach the same Sg as your main tank. Then give them a few days at full salinity to fully adjust and get strong. Feed them good foods to help them along.

    This way you improve you main tank's water quality by doing a few wc's and you slowly acclimate your FW fishes over to the exact water chemistry as your main sw tank.

    When you move the mollies/guppies over to the sw tank, make sure to feed your sw fish an hour before and turn off at least some powerheads and lights to give your mollies/guppies a chance to settle in, they really struggle with the flow in our reef systems.

    Most of my guppies took the ride down the overflow and into the sump/refuge and now each the algae and little "bugs" down there.
     

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