What to do when your fish goes blind???

Discussion in 'Marine Fish Forum' started by jlanger, Jun 29, 2018.

  1. jlanger

    jlanger "The North Remembers"
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    I currently have a dilemma with my female Percula Clownfish; she's gone blind.

    The fish was perfectly healthy while she (and her mate) were residing in my old 120gal reef system. When that system was torn down, the pair of clownfish were moved into a temporary system along with a couple pieces of live rock and two colonies of Duncan corals (hosting the clowns) and some various mushrooms. Over time, I noticed that the female clownfish would not venture far away from the duncan colonies; keeping constant contact with the corals. During feedings, she would dart a short distance to grab some food before going back into the corals. I could sense that her vision wasn't quite what is was as she would often miss grabbing some food. More recently, she won't ever leave the corals and I need to target feed her with a long pipette. Even now, she frantically bites at the food trying to catch anything that makes it into her mouth. It's quite sad, really.

    The temporary system is my old Fluval M60 with some live rock and ceramic beads for biological filtration and filter floss for mechanical filtration. The lighting is provided by the Ecoxotic Panoramic strips that I used to use on my frag section of the sump. The corals are doing okay; they open and look healthy but not as vibrant as when under the Radions and T5 bulbs. It's more or less a "furnished" quarantine set up.

    I have not ever experienced a fish going blind before, although Bill Capman had a similar experience with his male clownfish when it was moved into a new system. The fish is healthy, but it was just not behaving like itself and I noticed that the clownfish's vision was impaired. So this experience isn't unheard of. Has anyone else ever experienced a fish losing its vision from a transfer??? Or another reason???

    I have been debating on moving the pair of clownfish into my office tank; for a couple of reasons. Foremost, I'd like to be able to take down the temporary system. Secondly, I wasn't planning on placing the clownfish pair into my new 120gal system. What I'm debating on is, will this additional move be beneficial or more detrimental to her health? In the temporary system, I can easily feed her and know of her location. In the office system, she could end up hiding/residing anywhere and it may be difficult feeding her.

    I'll most likely move her at some point; it's just when... and where.
     
  2. patent

    patent Ok Moderator
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    Can't say I have good advice for you. I think when they can't see to eat, its hard to do much for them.

    Sorry to see it, its hard when a long time fish gets ill.
     
  3. acharpenter

    acharpenter Administrator
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    Where ever you end up putting her - it seems like you are likely to be target feeding from here on out.
     
  4. OP
    jlanger

    jlanger "The North Remembers"
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    I know that I'll have to target feed her and I don't have a problem with doing that.
    The "benefit" of moving into the office tank would be so that there is a lot more corals and rock work for her to feel comfortable with. Stating that, I hope she settles in an area that is accessible and allows me to feed her.
     
  5. Discus fever

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    I know you are an experienced reefer but have you ruled out parasites such as flukes, etc? The move may have stressed it out and made it susceptable to infections or parasites. Sometimes we overlook the simple answers.
    Maybe take a good macro pic and look on a large screen for clues.
     
  6. OP
    jlanger

    jlanger "The North Remembers"
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    Just to update...

    I moved the pair of clownfish into my office system and they're doing fine.
    The female has taken up a liking to the top of the glass wall as her host. I thought adding her into a tank filled with soft corals would give her a plethora of more suitable hosts, but she has decided that the glass wall provides her with the most security. The male has taken up residence in the crown of a nearby umbrella leather coral; it's within close proximity to the female, so he's never far away.
    I still target feed her the best that I can. It's rather easy since she stays close to the surface of the water and along the glass wall, but she gets excited when food is added to the water and she tends to miss the pieces that are placed directly in front of her mouth.
    I actually came home one day thinking that she was a goner as she was stuck to the overflow box, but she must've only been napping. I picked her off the overflow box and she immediately swam to her spot and resumed her normal routine. I thought about ending her misery but decided to see how she would fare overnight; that was two weeks ago and she's still kicking. Such a tough old broad!!!
     

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