Advice needed on DIY Stand 60xL, 36xW, 24xT

Discussion in 'DIY Forums' started by Juskr, Feb 28, 2019.

  1. Juskr

    Juskr Junior Member
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    Hello TCMAS,

    I need some help. I will be starting a new tank build thread as I look to upgrade from my 120 to a 225. I was fortunate enough to find a great used glass tank from another member with unique dimensions (60"L, 36"W, 24"T).

    I tried combing through various forums to see if I could find guidance on a DIY stand for the dimensions but so far I am struggling to find answers.

    Using the picture below for reference, I am hoping someone can help me with the following questions.

    1. Do I need to use 2x6s for the "red board 60" & yellow board 36"" top frame or could I double up 2x4's? I am leaning towards 2x6's

    2. Would a center brace (blue board) be necessary?

    3. Would I be able to carry the weight with only 4 legs or would I need to add a support in the middle of the red board?

    Thanks in advance.



    [​IMG]
     
  2. jlanger

    jlanger "The North Remembers"
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    One quick question...
    Does the tank have the plastic trim around the base?
    If so, the trim is going to be supporting the glass which will really help determine your needs.

    Following RocketEngineer’s plans...
    1. No. You can get by with a single 2x4 frame around the top and bottom.
    2. No, but it would help to keep the front and back from bowing. I would add one or two on a 60” long stand.
    3. No. The black trim is supporting the glass. The stand is supporting the frame at the four corners.

    One of the most important components to this plan is added pieces that support the top frame; the purple boards. The weight of the tank and water need to be supported all the way to the floor. If all four corners of the top frame have solid support to the floor, you’ll be fine.
    This design works because it is seriously overbuilt, but it works for those with limited skills and tool; and 2x lumber materials are easily sourced.
    And it wouldn’t be my post without mentioning the importance of using enough wood glue. Properly glued joints will hold more weight than the screws you use to assemble the stand. Titebond III is great for stand builds; it’s formulated for outdoor use.


    By the way, that tank has awesome dimensions!!!
     
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  3. OP
    Juskr

    Juskr Junior Member
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    Thanks Jason,

    I really appreciate your expertise and your tanks have been an inspiration for me. If your ever in the Eden Prairie area, you are more then welcome to stop by and enjoy a Surly (or beverage of your choice).

    I am not sure if it has plastic trim around the base. As a sneak peak, I attached a few pictures of the new tank, new location of tank, and current tank. The tank will be located on a concrete slab on the ground floor which will provide a great foundation for the purple boards.

    Current Tank
    IMG_4622.jpg

    Future Tank
    IMG_3872.jpg IMG_6056[4130].JPG

    Future tank location
    IMG_3842.jpg IMG_3845.jpg IMG_3846.jpg
     
  4. jlanger

    jlanger "The North Remembers"
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    Thanks for adding the photos.

    The new tank looks rimless at the base so you'll want to make sure that you have full support along all four sides and the bottom. Using something to help create a level surface for the tank is a must; i.e. foam, rubber pad, etc. I would recommend adding a 3/4" thick plywood top to the stand also. The construction lumber isn't going to be perfectly flat. By adding a plywood top, you can use shims to support any major gaps; minor gaps won't be of any concern.

    Concrete floor is a great foundation, but they're more prone to be uneven. When it comes time to level the stand, you're going to be concerned with shimming the corners to get the stand level. If you have any gaps along the spans of the stand, you don't really need to shim those. If you want to place a couple of shims under the spans where the corners of the sump are located, that would be okay. There's no need to go overboard with shims; the weight is being supported in the four corners.

    Here's a photo of the RocketEngineer stand I built for the high school lab.

    [​IMG]

    It was built following the same plan.
    The stand was built 48" long and 24" deep but the display was only 18" deep so I added a 3/4" thick top and deck to the stand. I didn't add any extra support pieces (purple in drawing) to the stand directly under the front of the tank as there is more than enough support from the plywood top and 2x lumber.

    You'll also notice that the stand is "floating". I added polycarbonate pads underneath each corner to raise the stand off of the floor. I still needed to shim to one of the corners to level the stand. The entire weight of the stand and system is sitting on four 3/8" x 3" x 3" polycarbonate pads.The reason the stand is not sitting directly onto the floor is because this is an aquaculture lab where there are many filtration systems that get backlashed into a drain tile. The floor gets wet! Having the stand off of the floor helps prolong the life of the stand by keeping it away from the possibility of sitting in water.
     
    #4 jlanger, Mar 1, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019
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  5. DarkSky

    DarkSky Administrator
    Site Admin Lifetime Member Event Committee Meeting Host 2018

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    As an aside, you're going to have to do a lot of waterproofing to that back wall. :)
     

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