Angler Fish?

Discussion in 'Marine Fish Forum' started by Fross, Mar 5, 2019.

  1. Fross

    Fross Senior Member
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    I never really see anyone talking about keeping Angler's, and for some reason I have never really looked into them until just recently. They are rather small, peaceful and reef safe with caution, at least stated by Live Aquaria. I think they are freaking sweet looking. So whats the catch (punny). There has to be a reason why no one is keeping them? I understand that as carnivores they would probably eat anything smaller than them, but they are pretty small themselves.

    Anyone got the deets?
     
  2. jlanger

    jlanger "The North Remembers"
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    Anglers are great for a smaller species only tank!

    Anglerfish not very common among reefers due to their success pivots on their environment and dietary habits.
    Dietary habits is the easier to diagnose. Don't be misled by their small size, they will attempt to eat anything just as large as they are; even larger once in a while. Their stomachs are extremely large and flexible, so you will run the risk of the angler attempting to eat anything from its size on down. Also finding a specimen that is already eating prepared foods can be a challenge. Most reefers don't want to deal with keeping a live food source for the fish, so finding an angler that readily accepts frozen foods is key. LiveAquaria Diver's Den does a great job with acclimating fussy eaters to frozen foods, so they would be a good source for an angler if you're in the market for one.
    The environment that you keep an anglerfish is also a key factor in keeping them. Anglers rely on their coloration and decoration for camouflage so having a tank filled with corals helps to reduce the stress on the fish. A bare tank with just rock will cause the fish to constantly hide or search for a place too hide; not what you'd want as a fish keeper. Another environmental factor goes back to tank mates; other fish. Most larger reef fish (too big to be eaten) are often benthic feeders; they pick at the rock and coral looking for food. Fish that are constantly picking at the rock will most likely pick at the anglerfish causing stress and potential damage. The other larger fish (wrasses, anthias, etc.) that wouldn't pick at the angler are too quick when it comes to feeding and they'll eat all of the food before the angler would attempt to catch any. You'll need to target feed the angler; another check mark against the angler.
    And some people just don't want to keep a venomous fish in their tanks.

    So for the best results, what you're left with is a fully stocked reef tank with just an anglerfish.
    They may be high maintenance, but there are a couple of species that I would love to keep some day in a species only tank.
     
  3. Riley

    Riley I contributed!
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    Did the latest issue of Coral prompt your question? I kept on in the past. It was my #2 favorite fish I ever had, and the only one I ever named. It needs a species tank - I believe some even need to be kept alone - I kept mine in a 20 gallon high with a hob canister filter with supplemental biomedia. It ate live only at first, but was large enough to be able to eat live fish, which made it much easier. I'd get 1-3 mollies at a time and put them in there. While feeding mollies, I was able to train it to eat silversides, and then didn't need mollies anymore. Then I was able to feed whatever I put in the tank, which was usually larger chunks of seafood. It was so fun to see it's lure go nuts for a chunk of food. Angler's are easy to clean up after. They crap a sack that's able to be carefully picked up, which greatly helps water quality.

    Another reason no one keeps them, is because it like keeping a pet rock -- literally. The angler's job is to go unnoticed and blend into the background. It's going to look like you're keeping an aquarium with no fish. If you can get passed that, they are one of the most interesting fish in their own way and one definitely worth keeping!
     
  4. marty9876

    marty9876 Something funny
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    So... what was his name?
     
  5. Riley

    Riley I contributed!
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